Taste of Tea :: Tai Ping Hou Kui

Hey there, tea drinkers! In this Taste of Tea post I’ll relay my tea-tasting journal entry for a Tai Ping Hou Kui loose leaf of tea; I purchased this particular Tai Ping Hou Kui from High Garden in Nasvhville, TN. This is the first tea I’ve had of this kind, and I was looking forward to trying it.

Type of Tea: Green Tea, loose

Tasting Notes 

Dry tea: The scent emanating from the dry tea was sweet with an element of dry grass, and slight vegetal quality. The tea leaves were whole, large and flat, with various shades of mid to light greens. They were actually quite striking, with a size and shape that are a contrast to most other teas I’ve seen.

I warmed the teapot and added the dry tea to help further activate its scent. The activated scent had a bit more vegetal, umami, character.

Suggested Preparation (from the package): 1 tablespoon per 12-16 oz (355-473 mL) with 175°F (79°C) water for 3 minutes

Preparation (how I prepared it): roughly 2 teaspoons in approximately 170 mL (5.8 oz) of 80-85°C (176-185°F) water for 1 minute (no initial wash).

Tea liquor: After infusing, the scent coming off of the liquor was light, but had a vegetal note. The color of the liquor was a very pale yellowish color, with maybe just a slight hint of green in the hue.

The tea liquor was umami and vegetal, with a slight hint of grass, and a bit of a mineral sweetness in the finish. I also picked up a bit of a floral note, maybe honeysuckle, in the taste.

2nd infusion (same brewing parameters): The liquor was a little darker in color. The same flavors were present, however, the balance was a little different; the umami-vegetal flavors were a little toned down, the minerality in the finish was slightly stronger, and floral note was less noticeable.

Quick Summary

  • Tea: Tai Ping Hou Kui, green tea, loose leaf
  • Pick: first two leaves
  • Processing: pan fried and with heated shaping (flattening)
  • Origin: Anui Province, China
  • Season: Spring 2018
  • Elevation: ~700 meters
  • Retailer: Highgarden (Nashville, TN)
  • Current Price: $10.50 / oz, $36.50 / 4 oz
  • Major Flavor Notes: umami, vegetal
  • Finish: mineral sweetnes, slight dryness

Final Thoughts: With its visually striking large whole flat-pressed leaves, this umami and vegetal green tea with its hint of grassiness, mild floral note, and a mineral-sweet finish makes for a delicious and interesting tea time. It reminds me a little of the flavor palete I’ve experienced in some Japanese greens such as kukicha (which is a favorite of mine). Although I only recorded the first two infusions, I think this tea could easily yield at least a couple more. Indeed, I look forward to more sessions with this tea.

Thanks for reading! As always, these are my tasting notes, and since the perception of taste and aroma can be quite personal your experience will likely, and indeed probably should, differ from mine. But regardless, I hope this post inspires you to get out there and to keep trying new teas. And if you don’t already, I’d encourage you to try making your own tasting notes as you do!

What tea should I try next? Drop me a line down in the comments and share your suggestion.

And don’t forget to Like, Share, and Follow. Your support is greatly appreciated! It really does help me (i.e., my motivation) and the blog! And once you’re done here, be sure to head over to the BlakesTeaJournalBlog Zazzle store and check out my awesome tea-themed designs.

That’s it, tea drinkers. Until next time, keep enjoying the wondrous taste of tea! — Blake – the tea drinker behind Blake’s Tea Journal

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: